MyTransHealth



pst- There’s a new site coming. Kade, Annika, and I have been hard at work on it. There will be fourteen new locations and the homepage looks like this.

For now, here’s a look at the current site.







In 2014 I co-founded MyTransHealth. It’s a resource designed to help trans people find access to quality healthcare.

Looking back, the branding was the easy thing. We were initially going to call it TransHealth but that was already taken. We added the ‘my’ to ensure the focus was on you. As for the icon, it’s: + H. simple as that.

The main problem is this. Access to quality healthcare is a universal need, yet lack of adequate care is a crisis in this community. For a population of over 750,000 Americans, this is unacceptable. Our solution is this. Historically, the best resource for (reliable and safe) trans healthcare has been word of mouth. MyTransHealth is a platform to filter access.

Here’s what a single entry looks like. The focus of this information is on what’s most important for the people who need help.







How to get a person to the right provider or organization is the hard part. This is where we started.







Qualitative research that I had done all pointed to needing a quick result. I needed the bare minimum of information from you in order to provide help. This meant asking three questions: what’s your identity, where do you live, and what do you need access to? I originally had additional access in the beginning but it was just asking too much from a person.

There were a lot of discussions about if this was right approach. Should it just be a basic search where you tap stuff or a guided search where we help? I turned it into a real life scenario to advocate for both: You go into a library. You can either try to find your book or you can ask a librarian for help. Guided search is your librarian. The flow became Search/Guided Search.





The backend wiring looks different than what the front end does so that we speak in doctor language and use the right words. E.g., AMAB, which means assigned male at birth, makes a lot of trans women (including myself) uncomfortable, but that’s how doctors understand that you probably want estrogen.

Here’s the top three questions:


Identity

AMAB (Assigned Male At Birth)
AFAB
(Assigned Female At Birth)
Intersex
Non-Binary
Location

New York City
San Francisco
Miami
Seattle
Chicago
Dallas
Access

Medical
Mental Health
Crisis Care
Legal



Here’s what happens in the identity field, from a mapping perspective. Whatever language a person wants to use that makes them feel comfortable is great for us — we just need to map it to the right person that can help.



AMAB

Male to Female
Trans Female
Trans* Female
MTF
Trans Woman
Trans* Woman
Transfeminine
Transgender Female
Transgender Woman
Transsexual Woman
Transsexual Female
Trans
Trans*
Trans Person
Trans* Person
Transgender
Transgender Person
Transsexual
Transsexual Person
AFAB

Female to Male
Trans Male
Trans* Male
Trans Man
Trans* Man
FTM
Transsexual Male
Transsexual Man
Transgender Male
Transgender Man
Transmasculine
Trans
Trans*
Trans Person
Trans* Person
Transgender
Transgender Person
Transsexual
Transsexual Person

Intersex

Agender
Androgyne
Androgynous
Bigender
Cis
Cisgender
Cis Female
Cis Male
Cis Man
Cis Woman
Cisgender Female
Cisgender Male
Cisgender Man
Cisgender Woman
Female to Male
FTM
Gender Fluid
Gender Nonconforming
Gender Questioning
Gender Variant
Genderqueer
Intersex
Male to Female
MTF
Neither
Neutrois
Non-binary
Other
Pangender
Trans
Trans*
Trans Female
Trans* Female
Trans Male
Trans* Male
Trans Man
Trans* Man
Trans Person
Trans* Person
Trans Woman
Trans* Woman
Transfeminine
Transgender
Transgender Female
Transgender Male
Transgender Man
Transgender Person
Transgender Woman
Transmasculine
Transsexual
Transsexual Female
Transsexual Male
Transsexual Man
Transsexual Person
Transsexual Woman
Two-Spirit
Non-binary

Agender
Androgyne
Androgynous
Bigender
Female to Male
FTM
Gender Fluid
Gender Nonconforming
Gender Questioning
Gender Variant
Genderqueer
Intersex
Male to Female
MTF
Neither
Neutrois
Other
Pangender
Trans
Trans*
Trans Female
Trans* Female
Trans Male
Trans* Male
Trans Man
Trans* Man
Trans Person
Trans* Person
Trans Woman
Trans* Woman
Transfeminine
Transgender
Transgender Female
Transgender Male
Transgender Man
Transgender Person
Transgender Woman
Transmasculine
Transsexual
Transsexual Female
Transsexual Male
Transsexual Man
Transsexual Person
Transsexual Woman
 

It’s a lot, right? The same thing happens when a person selects what kind of access they need.



Medical

Primary Care
Dental Care
Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)
Sexual/Reproductive Health
HIV/AIDS Testing
HIV/AIDS Care
Electrolysis
Laser Hair Removal
Double-Mastectomy Chest Surgery
Peri-Areolar Chest Surgery
Hysterectomy
Oopherectomy
Phalloplasty
Metoidioplasty
Breast Augmentation/Implants
Facial Feminization Surgery (FFS)
Tracheal Shave
Abdominoplasty
Orchiectomy
Penectomy
Labiaplasty
Clitiroplasty
Vaginoplasty
Egg Freezing
Sperm Banking
Healthcare Registration
Fertility Treatment
Acupuncture
Speech-Language Pathology
Mental Health

Individualized Therapy
Individualized Psychiatry
Group Therapy
Family/Couples Therapy
Substance Abuse Counseling
Substance Abuse Treatment
Mood Disorder Specialization
Behavioral Psychiatry
PTSD Specialization
Mental Health Assessment
Mental Health Referrals
Crisis Care

Suicide Intervention
Food Assistance
Emergency Housing
Transitional Housing
Employment/Education Assistance
Victim Assistance
Legal

Name Change
Gender Marker Change
ID Documents
Legal Representation
Prisoner Advocacy
Immigration
Family Law
Housing
Employment



Here’s how this shakes out in the world of a use case. Jane Doe is a trans woman. She lives in San Francisco and needs access to hormones. She speaks english, has private insurance, and can pay with any available option.

From there, I did basic wireframes.





And finally I was ready to start with visual design.






I originally had all the content in boxes but once we added in a second language, I had to restructure the design.  When I took out all the content from boxes I saw how little I was giving hierarchy to where I wanted you to go. After a few iterations, I ended up placing the search icon in the menu bar for return visitors so that I could get the first time visitor where I really wanted them: Guided Search.








We launched in six cities with 500 providers/organizations. After a brief mental break, we started on the second iteration which we’re working on at this moment. If you’re interested in learning more, watch me give this talk on it at AIGA’s National Conference.